Which isotope of carbon is used in radioactive carbon dating

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The number of parent isotopes decreases while the number of daughter isotopes increases but the total of the two added together is a constant.You need to find how much of the daughter isotopes in the rock (call that isotope ``A'' for below) are the result of a radioactive decay of parent atoms.However, the crater number relation must be calibrated against something with a known age.To measure the passage of long periods of time, scientists take advantage of a regularity in certain unstable atoms.

One common sense rule to remember is that the number of parent isotope atoms the number of daughter isotope atoms = an unchanging number throughout time.After another half-life, there is 1/2 of that 1/2 left = 1/2 × 1/2 = 1/4 of original amount of the parent left.After yet another half-life, there is 1/2 of that 1/4 left = 1/2 × 1/2 × 1/2 = 1/8 of the original amount of the parent left (which is the fraction asked for).That number is also the amount of parent that has decayed (remember the rule #parent #daughter = constant). in the age measurements of less than 100 million years.The narrow range of ages is taken to be how long it took the parent bodies of the meteorites to form.

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